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  • Bicep Tendonitis

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    Bicep Tendonitis

    The biceps muscle at the front of the upper arm, used to raise the arm and bend the elbow, is attached to both the shoulder and the elbow by means of tendons, tough cords of a connective tissue called collagen. Tendons pull on bones when muscles are contracted, causing movement of the bone. If the tendon is injured it can cause pain or inflammation. This condition is called biceps tendonitis, although it may also be known as tendinopathy if there is pain but no inflammation.

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  • Elbow Arthritis

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    Elbow Arthritis

    Arthritis is chronic (long lasting) inflammation of a joint. There are several forms of the disease, but all are characterized by the progressive loss of cartilage in a joint. The elbow is a hinged joint formed by the articulation of three bones, the humerus of the upper arm and the radius and ulna of the forearm. Each articulating surface is covered with protective smooth cartilage that cushions the bones and enables them to slide across each other without friction. The conformation of the bone ends that form the elbow, and the strength of the supporting ligaments result in a joint that usually articulates evenly. With age and use this articular cartilage deteriorates, leaving bone surfaces exposed. Bones often respond by growing more bone, decreasing the distance between them. Eventually movement of the elbow joint causes the bones to rub directly against each other, triggering inflammation, pain and deformity, the condition known as osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a progressive condition also known as degenerative joint disease and is more likely to develop when a person is aged 50 or over.

  • Elbow Bursitis

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    Elbow Bursitis

    Elbow bursitis, also known as olecranon bursitis, is a term used to describe the inflammation of a bursa that is found between the skin of the elbow and the olecranon, which is the bony tip of the elbow. A normal bursa is a flat, fluid-filled sac that lies between various tissues and structures such as tendons and bones to cushion them and allow them to glide smoothly over each other. There are many bursae in the body, the major ones found at the large joints. If a bursa is injured or inflamed it swells with extra fluid, creating pressure that can lead to irritation and pain.

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  • Elbow Hyperextension

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    Elbow Hyperextension

    Hyperextension of the elbow is the term used to describe the injury caused when an elbow joint is forced backwards beyond its normal range of motion, resulting in damage to the soft tissues in the joint.

  • Golfers Elbow

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    Golfer's Elbow

    Golfer’s elbow is a term used to describe an overuse injury to the elbow, commonly suffered by, but not restricted to, golfers. Medically known as medial epicondylitis, this condition refers specifically to pain and inflammation of the forearm tendons where they attach to the medial epicondyle, the bony protuberance on the inner side of the elbow. It is a similar injury to tennis elbow but occurs on the opposite side of the joint.

  • Little League Elbow

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    Medial Epicondylar Apophysitis

    Little League elbow (medial epicondylar apophysitis) is a term used to describe an overuse injury often sustained by children and adolescent baseball players, usually those who spend a lot of time pitching. Excessive overhead throwing places too much strain on the growth plate of the medial epicondyle, which is a bony protuberance on the inner side of the elbow. The muscles of the forearm attach onto the medial epicondyle by way of tendons, as does one of the ligaments in the elbow that provides stability to the joint when throwing.

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  • Nursemaid Elbow

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    Nursemaid Elbow

    This injury is commonly found in children under school age, usually aged between one and three. Nursemaid elbow describes a condition where two of the three bones of the elbow joint have become displaced. The medical term for this injury is radial head subluxation. The term nursemaid elbow comes from when women had to carry heavy milk buckets. Now, workers such as baggage handlers are more vulnerable to this sort of injury. In children, girls tend to suffer from this condition more than boys, and the left arm is usually the injured limb.



  • Osteochondritis Dissecans Elbow

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    Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the elbow is an increasingly diagnosed condition in which a portion of articular cartilage, together with a layer of bone, becomes damaged. Osteo- refers to bone, chondro- refers to cartilage, and -itis describes inflammation. With OCD, the affected area of bone loses its blood supply. That portion of bone then dies, cracking and eventually breaking away from the main part of the bone. The fragment or fragments of bone and cartilage may then become stuck within the elbow joint, causing the more severe symptoms associated with this condition. Although OCD can occur in other joints of the body, this condition most commonly affects the elbow or knee.

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  • Tennis Elbow (LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS)

    Tennis Elbow (LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS)

    Tennis elbow is the common name for the inflammation or injury of elbow tendons, which are tough bands of tissue that connect muscle to the bone. Despite its name, this condition is not limited to tennis players. Any occupational or recreational activity that involves repetitive elbow use (weight lifting, hammering, etc.) can lead to lateral epicondylitis.


  • Tricep Tendonitis

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    Tricep Tendonitis

    Tricep tendonitis is a term used to describe inflammation, damage or rupture of the triceps tendon. The triceps muscle runs down the back of the upper arm and is responsible for straightening the elbow. At its proximal (upper) end it is attached to the shoulder blade and humerus (the bone in the upper arm) and at its distal (lower) end it inserts into the ulna (one of the two forearm bones) by means of the triceps tendon. Like all tendons, the triceps tendon is a very strong, dense sheath formed by strands of connective tissue. When the triceps muscle is contracted, the tendon pulls on the ulna and causes the arm to straighten.

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